2017 Speakers

Richard Nowak

Richard Nowak

An Innovation Dialogue

Richard Nowak graduated from New Jersey Institute of Technology in 1999 with a B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Albert Dorman Honors College. Rich joined Siemens as a design engineer trainee in 1999. Within 2 years Rich was promoted to the engineering supervisor role. Rich's department handled the design of complex pharmaceutical production facilities, lab and research facilities, and mission critical data centers throughout NJ. He completed his M.B.A. concentrating in Management Information Systems from NJIT in 2003. In 2004 Rich accepted the role of Business Development Manager where he was responsible for providing technical guidance to consulting engineers concerning the specification of new energy management and DDC control systems for laboratory buildings, mission critical facilities, office buildings, healthcare institutions, etc. Rich also provided technical assistance for the design of integrated building systems including fully integrated BMS, Fire Alarm, Security, Lighting Control and IT systems. In 2009, Rich was promoted to New Jersey Area Sales Manager and in 2013 received additional responsibility for New York as well. In 2016, Rich was once again promoted this time to the role of Head of Strategic projects for Siemens North America.

Autumn Engh

Autumn Engh

Transposition in a Nutshell - Mitigating Transmission Power Line Losses Without Breaking the Bank

Autumn is pursuing an accelerated Master's in Renewable Energy Engineering at Oregon Institute of Technology - Wilsonville and plans to graduate in June of 2017. While in school, she has been working for the Bonneville Power Administration in the Transmission Line Design Department and Control Operations with a focus on electrical effects and transmission efficiency. Autumn is also a US Navy 2nd Class Nuclear Machinist's Mate veteran. After completing the Nuclear Power Engineering program and obtaining her operational license, Autumn maintained nuclear mechanical operations and reactor plant design and maintenance on A2W, A4W, S1G, and modified S7G class reactor plant systems for ten years.

Nick Gurnon

Nick Gurnon

Strategies and Roadblocks to Commercialization of High Capacity Lithium Ion Batteries

Nick is a Scientist at Polaris Battery Labs, a lithium ion battery prototyping facility located in Beaverton. He's part of a small team that designs, fabricates, and tests custom lithium ion cells for clients that include large scale manufacturers, startups, universities, and national labs. Much of his work is centered around formulation development and fundamental performance improvement for next-generation electrode materials. Nick has a Master's Degree in Chemistry with a focus on Semiconductor Device Processing from the University of Oregon and a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from Bates College.

Hillary Booth

Hillary Booth

How Environmental Sampling Solved a Salmonella Mystery in Oregon

Hillary Booth is Foodborne Disease Epidemiologist for the Oregon Public Health Division, where she has worked for the past 10 years. In addition to investigating outbreaks and developing surveillance tools and protocols, Hillary coordinates the Northwest Center for Foodborne Outbreak Management, Epidemiology, and Surveillance, an Integrated Food Safety Center of Excellence. Research interests include infectious disease surveillance, molecular epidemiology, and public health informatics (particularly the design of outbreak investigation templates and data systems).

Dr. Terry Medler

Dr. Terry Medler

Complement C5a Regulates Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis

Dr. Terry Medler is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the laboratory of Lisa M. Coussens, Ph.D. at Oregon Health & Science University. His research focuses on the role of complement in cutaneous diseases, including squamous cell carcinoma and pemphigus vulgaris. The complement system consists of about 30 circulating proteins produced by the liver that become activated upon encountering pathogens or damaged tissue. Once activated, immune cells are recruited and stimulated in an effort to respond to the insult and clear the infection and/or damaged tissue. However, we've learned that this pathway is chronically activated in squamous cell carcinoma and instead of helping tissue heal, it actively promotes cancer progression. By understanding how complement facilitates cancer development, we can begin to design rational therapies to translate these findings to the clinic.

Kara McFall

Kara McFall

IT Security Goes Organic

Kara McFall is director of the University of Oregon Applied Information Management master's program. Prior to her move to fulltime academia, Kara served as the financial and research applications manager within the Information Technology Group at Oregon Health & Science University. She has led large technology suites and overseen development teams at multiple employers in such roles as vice president of project management for an international online development company, program operations manager for a public-sector consulting company, and product manager for a suite of public sector software. She has more than 20 years of experience teaching project management and IT courses for a variety of universities. Kara is a former chair of the Oracle Higher Education User Group Product Advisory Group and the Northwest Oracle Users Group. She was also a board member and treasurer of the Oregon Native American Chamber and a member of its scholarship committee.

Christopher Dymond

Christopher Dymond

Building Energy Efficiency Power Plants - How the NW has avoided building smoke stacks

Christopher is a Senior Product Manager for NEEA where he identifies and evaluates new energy efficiency technologies with potential for significant energy savings. His primary focus is on residential technologies and new construction standards of practice including residential construction, HVAC, indoor air quality, clothes washers and dryers, and energy efficiency measures for multifamily buildings and manufactured homes.

Matt Fiedler

Matt Fiedler

Matt Fiedler is a program manager in the Surface group, most recently working as the program manager on the mechanical aspects of the Surface Studio. He began his career as a mechanical design engineer on the Surface 2 and 3 before transitioning into program management. Prior to working at Microsoft, he grew up on a farm in South Dakota and then spent his high school and college years in Oregon before moving to Seattle for graduate school at the University of Washington. In his free time he likes to rock climb and go mountaineering as much as possible.